Prudent move to set up system to find voter fraud

— The Brunswick News, April 7, 2020 — In the old Western movies, the good guys always caught the bad guys. They often managed the quick capture and arrest of thieving miscreants by heading them off at the pass. It’s the same strategy Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger is adopting to catch anyone committing […]
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— The Brunswick News, April 7, 2020 —

In the old Western movies, the good guys always caught the bad guys. They often managed the quick capture and arrest of thieving miscreants by heading them off at the pass.

It’s the same strategy Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger is adopting to catch anyone committing voter fraud during the upcoming political and general primaries.

He’s created a group made up of law enforcement personnel to brainstorm on ways to identify bogus votes cast May 19 and a procedure for investigating suspected cases of impropriety.

Prudent move indeed. Due to threat of COVID-19, it is a sure bet that more Georgians will opt to vote by absentee ballot this year to minimize exposure to others. That essentially moves the election away from the careful scrutiny and watchful eyes of trained poll workers to the privacy of one’s home.

Secretary of State Raffensperger is thinking in advance to do what he can to deny cheaters any opportunity to tamper with elections or attempt to alter an outcome. Absentee ballots have given more than one election supervisor a few gray hairs over the years.

That happens when signatures on applications and returned ballots fail to match or when someone applies for an absentee using an address that belongs to someone else.

With seven million registered voters in the state, count on some degree of confusion and incidental problems. It’s to be expected. Minor erros will hopefully be corrected and the ballot counted.

Georgia’s elections chief is doing what he can to safeguard the integrity of the state’s elections. It’s his duty to do whatever is necessary to ensure a clean, unmarred election. There are so many offices on ballots around the state this year, including all seats in the General Assembly and U.S. Congress.

Secretary of State Raffensperger is taking steps to make sure the man or woman declared the victor in each race is the choice of voters.